Malay culture and society

Shares borders with Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore and Brunei. It is also very similar to Indonesian, known locally as Bahasa Indonesia.

Malay culture and society

Malaysian Alternative Names Outsiders often mistakenly refer to things Malaysian as simply "Malay," reflecting only one of the ethnic groups in the society. Malaysians refer to their national culture as kebudayaan Malaysia in the national language.

Within Malaysian society there is a Malay culture, a Chinese culture, an Indian culture, a Eurasian culture, along with the cultures of the indigenous groups of the peninsula and north Borneo. A unified Malaysian culture is something only emerging in the country. The important social distinction in the emergent national culture is between Malay and non-Malay, represented by two groups: Sarawak and Sabah, the two Malaysian states located in north Borneo, tend to be less a influential part of the national culture, and their vibrant local cultures are shrouded by the bigger, wealthier peninsular society.

Malaysia is physically split between west and east, parts united into one country in Western Malaysia is on the southern tip of the Malay peninsula, and stretches from the Thai border to the island of Singapore.

Eastern Malaysia includes the territories of Sabah and Sarawak on the north end of Borneo, separated by the country of Brunei. Peninsular Malaysia is divided into west and east by a central mountain range called the Banjaran Titiwangsa. Most large cities, heavy industry, and immigrant groups are concentrated on the west coast; the east coast is less populated, more agrarian, and demographically more Malay.

The federal capital is in the old tinmining center of Kuala Lumpur, located in the middle of the western immigrant belt, but its move to the new Kuala Lumpur suburb of Putra Jaya will soon be complete. The government aims for increasing the national population to seventy million by the year Eighty percent of the population lives on the peninsula.

The most important Malaysian demographic statistics are of ethnicity: These population figures have an important place in peninsular history, because Malaysia as a country was created with demography in mind.

Malay leaders in the s and s organized their community around the issue of curbing immigration. After independence, Malaysia was created when the Borneo territories with their substantial indigenous populations were added to Malaya as a means of exceeding the great number of Chinese and Indians in the country.

The Austronesian language has an illustrious history as a lingua franca throughout the region, though English is also widely spoken because it was the administrative language of the British colonizers. Along with Malay and English other languages are popular: The Malaysian government acknowledges this multilingualism through such things as television news broadcasts in Malay, English, Mandarin, and Tamil.

Rapid industrialization has sustained the importance of English and solidified it as the language of business. The selection of official cultural symbols is a source of tension.

In such a diverse society, any national emblem risks privileging one group over another. For example, the king is the symbol of the state, as well as a sign of Malay political hegemony. Since ethnic diversity rules out the use of kin or blood metaphors to stand for Malaysia, the society often emphasizes natural symbols, including the sea turtle, the hibiscus flower, and the orangutan.

The government slogan "Malaysia Boleh! History and Ethnic Relations Emergence of the Nation. The name Malaysia comes from an old term for the entire Malay archipelago.

A geographically truncated Malaysia emerged out of the territories colonized by Britain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Malays (ethnic group) - Wikipedia

Britain was attracted to the Malay peninsula by its vast reserves of tin, and later found that the rich soil was also highly productive for growing rubber trees. Immigrants from south China and south India came to British Malaya as labor, while the Malay population worked in small holdings and rice cultivation.

What was to become East Malaysia had different colonial administrations: Together the cosmopolitan hub of British interests was Singapore, the central port and center of publishing, commerce, education, and administration.

The climactic event in forming Malaysia was the Japanese occupation of Southeast Asia from Japanese rule helped to invigorate a growing anti-colonial movement, which flourished following the British return after the war.

When the British attempted to organize their administration of Malaya into one unit to be called the Malayan Union, strong Malay protests to what seemed to usurp their historical claim to the territory forced the British to modify the plan. The other crucial event was the largely Chinese communist rebellion in that remained strong to the mids.

To address Malay criticisms and to promote counter-insurgency, the British undertook a vast range of nation-building efforts. Local conservatives and radicals alike developed their own attempts to foster unity among the disparate Malayan population.

These grew into the Federation of Malaya, which gained independence in Inwith the addition of Singapore and the north Borneo territories, this federation became Malaysia. Difficulties of integrating the predominately Chinese population of Singapore into Malaysia remained, and under Malaysian directive Singapore became an independent republic in The question reflects the tension between the indigenous claims of the Malay population and the cultural and citizenship rights of the immigrant groups.

Malay culture and society

A tentative solution came when the Malay, Chinese, and Indian elites who negotiated independence struck what has been called "the bargain.Singapore Society & Culture The Family.

The concepts of group, harmony, and mutual security are more important than that of the individual. Singapore is a multi-ethnic society where Chinese, Malay and Indian traditions coexist beneath the veneer of a western cosmopolitan metropolis.

Malay Culture and Society A Multi-Cultural Society. Malaysia is a multi-cultural society. The main ethnic groups are the native Malays as well as large populations of Chinese, and Indians.

When visiting the country it is clear that the ethnicities retain their religions, customs and way of life. The most important festivals of each group are. The culture of Malaysia draws on the varied cultures of the different people of Malaysia.

The Chinese have integrated with Malay culture in a number of areas, By Muslim Malay society had a negative reaction to Muslim women who do not wear tudung. Multicultural Society Malaysia’s rich and varied social and geographical history mean that its culture has been influenced by a wide range of individual beliefs.

It is a multi-racial country which is leading the way in terms of social integration and m. Society & Culture Malaysia has a population of about 25 million. It is a multi-racial country whose social integration has become a model for the rest of the world. 1 FOOD INTAKE IN MALAYSIAN CULTURE AND SOCIETY: FOCUS ON THE YOUNGER GENERATION Che Wan Jasimah bt.

Wan Mohamed Radzi1, Mohd Hazim Shah Abdul Murad2 & Osman Bakar3 Department of Science and Technology Studies, Faculty of Science.

Culture of Malaysia - history, people, clothing, traditions, women, beliefs, food, customs, family