The classic era

Haydn portrait by Thomas HardyBy the late s there were flourishing centers of the new style in Italy, Vienna, Mannheim, and Paris; dozens of symphonies were composed and there were bands of players associated with musical theatres. Opera or other vocal music accompanied by orchestra was the feature of most musical events, with concertos and symphonies arising from the overture serving as instrumental interludes and introductions for operas and church services. Over the course of the Classical period, symphonies and concertos developed and were presented independently of vocal music.

The classic era

In the middle of the eighteenth century, contemporaneous with the mature years of Bach and Handel, a new musical style developed that is known as Rococo or preclassical style. This style is most evident in keyboard and orchestral music, but it is mentioned here because it represented a transition from the Baroque to the Classical era, occurring between and In the world of painting, Rococo style is characterized by delicate colors, many decorative details, and a graceful and intimate mood.

Similarly, music in the Rococo style is homophonic and light in texture, melodic, and elaborately ornamented. In France, the term for this was style galant gallant or elegant style and in Germany empfindsamer stil sensitive style.

Bach and Johann Christian Bachin Germany, were important composers of music in the Rococo style. In the second half of the eighteenth century, a reaction against Rococo style occurred. There were objections to its lack of depth and to the use of decoration and ornamentation for their own sake.

By AllMusic Staff · Oct. 14, 2011

This led to the development of Classical style. The Classical period itself lasted from approximately to The name classical is applied to the period because in art and literature, there was keen interest in, admiration for, and emulation of the classical artistic and literary heritage of Greece and Rome.

Intellectually, this era has also been labeled the Age of Enlightenment. Philosophers such as Rousseau, Voltaire, and Montesquieu wrote of the value of the common person and the power of human reasoning in overcoming the problems of the world. This revolution in thinking inevitably led to conflict between the old order and new ideas.

The French and American revolutions in the last quarter of the eighteenth century were stimulated by this new attitude. The musical scene in the classical period reflected the changes occurring in the society in which the music was being written.

This was the first era in music history in which public concerts became an important part of the musical scene. Music was still being composed for the church and the court, but the advent of public concerts reflected the new view that music should be written for the enjoyment and entertainment of the common person.

Unlike the Renaissance or Baroque eras, which included many important composers and trends, the choral music of the classical era was dominated by three composers: For the first time, during the Classical period most of the important stylistic advances that occurred can be observed most clearly in the instrumental forms: Church music tended to be more conservative than secular compositions, which also helps to explain why stylistic innovations were seen most clearly in instrumental music but were less prevalent in the choral music of the period.

Choral and instrumental forms overlapped during the Classical period to an unprecedented degree. Forms developed in the instrumental area were appropriated and used to good effect in choral music.

Sonata allegro form, for example, often found in sonata or symphony movements, is also used in sections of classical masses.

The classic era

Beethoven included choral sections in two instrumental works, his Choral Fantasia and the Ninth Symphony. This period in music history is sometimes referred to as "the Viennese Classic period," and it was centered in Vienna. Beethoven, Haydn, and Mozart, though none was a native Viennese, all worked in Vienna for significant periods in their careers.

Although Vienna was the focal point for musical activity of the period, classical music is not parochial but universal in spirit and in style. Important Forms Important forms of choral music during the classical period included the following: The mass continued to be an important form for each of the three primary Classical composers.

During the Classical period, masses involved orchestra, soloists, and choir in a fully integrated work, utilizing organizational principles derived from instrumental forms.

This concise treatment of the mass text may consist of strictly delimited development, simultaneous setting of several lines of text, or the omission of certain sections of the mass.

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When choral musicians refer to the Missa Solemnis they are usually speaking of Beethoven's Mass in D Major, a milestone in the development of choral music.

In a broader sense, however, the term refers to a more elaborate and extended musical treatment of the mass text than that employed in the Missa Brevis.

The Baroque oratorio tradition, begun by Carissimi and culminating in the works of Handel, was continued in the Classical period primarily by Haydn, who wrote two oratorios, The Creation and The Seasons, which have remained an important part of the choral repertoire.

Although many musical settings of the Requiem were composed during the Renaissance and Baroque periods, the Classical period produced a setting by Mozart completed by a student following Mozart's death that has become a staple of the choral repertoire and two settings by Cherubini that are also often performed.

Mozart wrote two settings of this service each of which includes psalms and the Magnificat, written for choir, quartet of soloists, and orchestra. A symphony which includes sections written for choir and orchestra. The earliest and probably best known example of this is Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, incorporating choir and soloists in the fourth movement.

Franz Joseph Haydn was born in the Rohrau, Austria, in At age eight he was accepted as a choirboy at St.

Classical period (music) - Wikipedia

Stephen's Cathedral in Vienna.The Classical period was an era of classical music between roughly to The period is sometimes referred to as the era of Viennese Classic or Classicism (German: Wiener Klassik), since Gluck, Mozart, Haydn, Salieri, Schubert, and Beethoven all worked in Vienna.

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Fight using assault rifles, shotguns, and more! This 2D adventure pits you against the ruthless gangs that run the streets of Graal%(K). In the Postclassic Period many of the great nations and cities of the Classic Era collapsed, although some continued, such as in Oaxaca, Cholula, and the Maya of Yucatán, such as at Chichen Itza and Uxmal.

This is sometimes seen as a period of increased chaos and warfare.

Classical Greece - HISTORY Classical Greece entered the Hellenistic period with the rise of Macedon and the conquests of Alexander the Great.
GraalOnline Classic Visit Website The Rise of Athens The defeat of the Persians marked the beginning of Athenian political, economic, and cultural dominance.
Persian Wars Haydn portrait by Thomas HardyBy the late s there were flourishing centers of the new style in Italy, Vienna, Mannheim, and Paris; dozens of symphonies were composed and there were bands of players associated with musical theatres.

Classic Era is clutch when it comes to grabbing a release I missed out on.. or even helping me sell some of my doubles when I'm low on funds. They have a crazy SUPREME collection and they've always worked with me when it comes to pricing/5(15). Defined as a time period in the history of western music, the Classical era begins about and ends around , overlapping a little with the surrounding periods of late Baroque and early Romantic music.

Classical antiquity - Wikipedia